• Weekly Economic Commentary

    Weekly Economic Commentary

    The U.S. dollar has come back strongly. After losing nearly 10% in 2017 and an additional 4% in January, the U.S. Dollar Index has rallied more than 5% off of its February lows [Figure 1]. Gains have been driven by several factors, particularly rising U.S. interest rates, partially due to increasing Federal Reserve (Fed) rate hike expectations, and repatriation of overseas profits as prescribed by the new U.S. tax law.

  • TAKING STOCK AFTER THE RALLY

    Weekly Market Commentary

    We continue to prefer emerging market (EM) equities in tactical asset allocations. EM equities have given back strong early-year gains, pushing the MSCI EM Index into negative territory year to date on a total return basis. Many headwinds have weighed on EM stocks, including rising interest rates, U.S. dollar strength (and related weakness in EM currencies), and trade war fears. Here we highlight five keys to our EM outlook.

  • Bond Market Perspectives

    Bond Market Perspectives

    Emerging market debt (EMD) recently had a rough month, with the Bloomberg Barclays Emerging Markets Sovereign Index losing 3.3% from April 18–May 18, 2018. The index currently yields almost 6.2%, its highest level since early 2016, and the spread to comparable Treasuries has also increased back to mid-2016 levels near 3.1%, as shown in Figure 1.

  • Market Insights July

    Market Insight

    Economic reports released in April 2018, largely reflecting economic activity in March, showed continued solid economic growth in the U.S. Growth did slow some in the first quarter, consistent with the historical seasonal trend, but showed signs of an April rebound.

     

     

     

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    Portfolio Compass

    The Portfolio Compass provides a snapshot of LPL Financial Research’s views on equity, equity sectors, fixed income, and alternative asset classes. This monthly publication illustrates our current views and will change as needed over a 3- to 12-month time horizon. Read recent issue...

  • Outlook 2018

    Outlook 2018

    OVER THE PAST EIGHT YEARS, extraordinarily accommodative monetary policy has served as the primary catalyst for spurring continued economic growth in the U.S. and around the globe. Although the economic expansion has delivered steady gross domestic product (GDP) growth, consistent returns for the broad stock market, and an improving job market, the expansion itself has been lackluster.

  • Midyear Outlook 2017

    Midyear Outlook 2017

    An important shift has taken place in this economic cycle. The Federal Reserve (Fed) was finally able to start following through on its projected rate hike path, raising rates twice in just over a three-month period. By doing so, the Fed showed increasing trust that the economy has largely met its dual mandate of 2% inflation and full employment, that the economy is progressively able to stand on its own two feet, and that fiscal policy may now provide the backstop to the economy that monetary policy has provided throughout the expansion.

  • Stock markets, bond markets, the economy, policy — some years they push and pull on each other lightly as markets follow their own path; in others, one influence, such as monetary policy, dominates.

    Outlook 2017

    Stock markets, bond markets, the economy, policy — some years they push and pull on each other lightly as markets follow their own path; in others, one influence, such as monetary policy, dominates. But sometimes, often following a period of change, understanding the pushes and pulls and how they interact becomes a key to reassessing market dynamics for the next year and beyond.

  • Midyear Outlook 2016

    Midyear Outlook 2016

    During any presidential election, you can expect a barrage of promises from the yard sign endorsements, bumper stickers, stump speeches, and media headlines. All pledge to improve the economy, provide better education for all, and preserve the environment.

  • Outlook 2016

    Outlook 2016

    The Economic Cycle - We believe we are in the mid-to-late stage of the current expansion, but we are still seeing some early cycle and late cycle behavior. Extended loose monetary policy, inflation, and employment growth are still exhibiting early cycle behavior, while some items relating to corporate profits are showing late cycle behavior, although they may be reset if profits improve.